Hush!

Hush! Don't tell anybody that the Earth is round.


I have just been on a pilgrimage to Darwin's home country to see the exhibition "Darwin's BIG Idea" at London's Natural History Museum.

I am fairly fit, but I almost didn't survive the last part of the journey as trains and tubes were delayed as usual - I had to run for life in order to get there in time for my slot.
The exhibition is extremely popular, and you must pay in advance for an exact time of entrance. However, even though I was late (and terrified by the thought of being let down), and even though I faced the sight of a long, long queue, I was so lucky to be naturally selected by a guard, who saw my crocodile tears and followed me personally all the way through gates and barriers.
Finally, in the great halls of fame, I adapted to the situation of being a sardine in a tin can, while struggling to see the sacred.

I was moved by seeing Darwin's scribbles, his studio and evidence of his curiosity into so many very different subject areas: barnacles, cabbage, beetles, orchids, facial expressions in animals and humans etc...

However, what seemed most peculiar to me, a lukewarm protestant from Nothern Europe, was the emphasis on convincing the audience about the truth of evolution. To me it was like trying to convince the audience that the earth is round, not flat.

I shall never be the same after this - I became aware of my own evolution paradigm specs. So, although I like the idea of freedom to read and freedom to think for yourself, I cannot put my money where my mouth is, when it comes to public school politics. To say it simply: I don't want my tax money to be spent on teaching (my daughter and son) creationism as a realistic alternative to evolution in schools.

Yes. Sure. Evolution rocks! But - contrary to Dawkins, Dennett and likeminded (not that I don't love (yo)U(r) (theories) guys :-)) - I still think there is plenty of room for God(s) and spirit and the unexplainable. Science doesn't diminish the miraculousness of Life.